Libraries
Libraries are an important resource for homeschoolers. Parents and children value librarians for the expertise they share when navigating the vast amounts of information found in today's libraries. Libraries also provide lending materials, educational materials, meeting space for support groups, and more.
National Libraries
America's Story from America's Library
This Web site is brought to you from the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., the largest library in the world and the nation's library. The site was designed especially with young people in mind, but there are great stories for people of all ages.
Library of Congress
The Library of Congress is the nation's oldest federal cultural institution and serves as the research arm of Congress. It is also the largest library in the world, with millions of books, recordings, photographs, maps and manuscripts in its collections. The Library's mission is to make its resources available and useful to the Congress and the American people and to sustain and preserve a universal collection of knowledge and creativity for future generations.
American Memory
American Memory provides free and open access through the Internet to written and spoken words, sound recordings, still and moving images, prints, maps, and sheet music that document the American experience. It is a digital record of American history and creativity. These materials, from the collections of the Library of Congress and other institutions, chronicle historical events, people, places, and ideas that continue to shape America, serving the public as a resource for education and lifelong learning.
Libraries & Homeschoolers: Working Together
19 Ways to Get the Most from Your Library

We all know the library is the homeschooler’s best friend. Where else can you go to find all those wonderful books, DVDs, and more for free? But your librarian can be even more helpful than you had realized. Here are some tips for getting the most from your library.

Homeschooling: Exploring the Potential of Public Library Service for Homeschooled Students

As the number of homeschooled students rises in this country, needs for resources, instruction and support also has risen. The homeschooled students, while not participating in the school classrooms and by extension the school or public libraries, have needs that should be satisfied by library services. These include access to materials and technology, information literacy skills instruction, reading and writing support, curriculum materials and methods, reference services, as well as areas to “make and take”, facilities for quiet study or to meet with mentors or tutors. In addition, homeschooled students need the kind of library skills instruction that all students in traditional school libraries receive. The purpose of this study is to identify the strengths and weaknesses of library support to homeschooled students and to make recommendations based upon analysis. 

The Perfect Partnership: Public Libraries and Homeschoolers
As a community partner, the public library can assist this growing population’s needs. The best scenario is one in which the library staff works with the local homeschool community. 
Homeschooling Families Tap into Library Services, from Storytime to Science Equipment

Across the country, librarians are stepping up to serve families who choose to educate their children themselves. Libraries have an important role in advancing education in whatever format. Many libraries offer events for homeschool families and offer programs and services that cater to home educators. 

Homeschooling and Libraries
This blog is written by Adrienne Furness and represents efforts to explore the homeschooling world and help librarians build good relationships with homeschooling families. Adrienne is a freelance writer and Children's Librarian at the Webster Public Library outside of Rochester, New York.
There's No Place Like… the Library!
On the rewards of the library-homeschool relationship, with practical suggestions of ways libraries can cultivate relationships with homeschoolers.
Libraries and Homeschools: The Perfect Partnership

This articles details all the ways that libraries can assist and support homeschoolers, including meeting spaces, collections of local materials, lectures and programs, book discussions, foreign language materials, and so much more.

Homeschoolers and Public Libraries: A Synergistic Relationship

Homeschoolers are commonly heavy users of their local libraries. Statistics show that more than 78 percent of home educators use the public library as their primary resource for curriculum supported materials. So, how do libraries become educational “hubs” for homeschoolers? They develop programs and services to support this burgeoning population by offering programs, digital information, and events that support homeschooling families. The energy and vibrant curiosity that home-educated children have, and the commitment and support their parents contribute, make libraries a better place for all. 

A Home Away from Home: Libraries & Homeschoolers
According to a 2003 study by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), when homeschoolers were asked about their primary source of books and/or curriculum, 78 percent named their public library. This article offers ideas for outreach and support to homeschooling families, including ideas for creating a homeschool information hot spot, touring the library with homeschool groups, offering targeted programs and more.
How to Homeschool Using Only the Library

The library is a wonderful resource for any homeschool parent. The resources found there help to enrich the curriculum or you can even use the library for all of your homeschooling material. These tips will help you get the most out of your local library. 

Make Room for Homeschoolers: Children Educated at Home Can help Make a Library More Fantastic

This unique library program in Floyd County, Indiana, offers ideas on how to provide programming for the homeschooling community. 

Looking for Another State?
Featured Resources

As an Amazon Associate, we earn from qualifying purchases. We get commissions for purchases made through links on this site.

More Charlotte Mason Education: A Home Schooling How-To Manual
After providing an important work in explaining the Charlotte Mason method for homeschoolers, Catherine Levison goes deeper into the use of this method in the home with her subsequent work. This book expands the information from the first book and offers ideas to incorporate the rich and uplifting philosophy into your home education. There are specific tips for high school, schooling through challenges, and more. 
Not So Fast: Parenting Your Teen Through the Dangers of Driving
Most driving literature for parents focuses on how to teach a teen to drive, without explaining why teen driving is so dangerous in the first place or giving parents a plan to preempt the hazards teens face. By contrast, Not So Fast empowers and guides parents to understand the causes and situations that most often lead to teen crashes and to take specific, proactive steps—before and each time a teen driver gets behind the wheel—to counteract them. This authoritative guide tackles hot button iss...
Montessori Life
Designed to provoke thought, professional growth and provide a forum for discussion of major issues & ideas in education.
Homeschool Bravely: How to Squash Doubt, Trust God, and Teach Your Child with Confidence
It's time to change your perspective to transform the way you plan, teach, and homeschool. This book helps you to see homeschooling as a calling. With this mindset, you'll be able to dismiss the stress of impossible expectations. Find strategies to help you juggle the logistics of homeschooling with different ages, be a good support for a struggling learner, set realistic goals, dismiss the guilt, and weather any criticism. You can be a hopeful homeschooler! God uses all for good and can transfo...
Homeschooling 101: A Guide to Getting Started
Homeschooling 101 gives you the steps to help you get started on your homeschool journey. This guide lays out how to get started, choose and gather curriculum, scheduling, organizing your home, and finding the joy in homeschooling. This book is perfect for new homeschoolers who are looking for real help in taking the first step.